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Isaac Harvey Fund Recipients to Speak on Their Experiences

Donors Make Fund Possible to Support College Persons' Travel and Service That Embrace Quaker Concerns

October 30, 2013

2012 graduate Patrick Carroll, second from the left, poses in Geneva, Switzerland, with Quaker United Nations Organization Summer School co-participants and new friends from Rwanda, Zambia and Iran. Carroll received support from the Isaac Harvey Fund.

2012 graduate Patrick Carroll, second from the left, poses in Geneva, Switzerland, with Quaker United Nations Organization Summer School co-participants and new friends from Rwanda, Zambia and Iran. Carroll received support from the Isaac Harvey Fund.

Ten Wilmington College students and faculty members that received financial assistance to pursue travel and service experiences in 2013 will speak on their endeavors Wednesday (Nov. 6) at 7:30 p.m., in the T. Canby Jones Meetinghouse.

The College’s Isaac Harvey Fund helped cover expenses for persons that traveled to such locales as Palestine and Costa Rica, Alaska and Florida.

Speaking will be Corey Cockerill, assistant professor of communications, and Monte Anderson, professor of agriculture, on their study of sustainability at a Quaker community in Central America. Also, Russell Kincaid, associate professor of mathematics, will discuss his environmental studies in Alaska.

Senior Travis O’Connor helped repair homes on South Dakota’s Pine Ridge Reservation and Ellen Short, a junior, organized students to attend Friends Committee on National Legislation’s Spring Lobby Weekend last March in Washington D.C.

Also, Michael Snarr, professor of political science, and junior Brianna Knisley worked with Christian Peacemaker Teams in Palestine. Senior Nate Godby and Michele Beery, professor of education, volunteered at an inner-city school in Florida.

In addition, senior Isaac Garrison represented WC at a Quaker college fair in Philadelphia.

The Isaac Harvey Fund assists Wilmington College students and faculty in traveling abroad and within the U.S. on trips related to such concerns of Quakers as peace and social justice. Participants do not need to be Quaker and the IHF money covers only a portion of expenses.

The fund’s vitality is dependent upon donor support.