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Japanese-American Visitors Explore Peace Resource Center

Group Tours Center's Exhibits, Learns of PRC Programs

January 31, 2013

A dozen Japanese-Americans and other visitors from the Japan America Society of Greater Cincinnati toured the Peace Resource Center and heard PRC director Jim Boland describe the center's facilities and programming.

A dozen Japanese-Americans and other visitors from the Japan America Society of Greater Cincinnati toured the Peace Resource Center and heard PRC director Jim Boland describe the center's facilities and programming.

A dozen members of the Japan America Society of Greater Cincinnati learned about a unique connection to their ancestors’ homeland that’s practically in their own back yard.

The group visited the Peace Resource Center at Wilmington College, which serves as a bridge between the United States and Japan.

The PRC hosts the largest depository outside of Japan of materials on the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II. The collection also includes many peace education-related materials.

Peace Resource Center director Jim Boland, professor of education, served as the group’s host. He said the Center works to keep alive founder Barbara Reynolds’ legacy by fulfilling the mission of “fostering and providing peace education in schools, communities and the world.”

The Japanese called Reynolds “the flower of Hiroshima,” as she sought to educate the world about the effects of the atomic bomb. She was an activist, author, and peace educator that, in August 1975, opened the Peace Resource Center at Wilmington College.

Boland shared the legend of the young Japanese girl, Sadako Sasaki, who, while suffering from leukemia brought about by radiation poisoning from the atomic bomb, attempted to fold 1,000 paper cranes from her hospital bed. Her story has, over the past half century, inspired many other children to fold paper cranes in memory of the children lost to all wars.

Among other resources and activities, the PRC also hosts the Institute for Problem Solving, which features peer mediation training, positive discipline training for classroom teachers and the acclaimed ProjectTRUST, which through in-school programs and retreats seeks to break down the barriers that exist between clique groups in school communities.